Yellowstone Art Museum

Recent Posts

New book corrals Waddell’s art, and a time and place, too

Achieve

A few years ago, the painter and sculptor Theodore Waddell was thinking it might be time, five decades into a productive career as an artist, for a book-length retrospective of his work. The more he thought about it, though, the less he wanted a coffee-table book solely about his art. He wanted a book that would tell the larger story of the artists and writers and friends he had learned from and worked with, of the ferment and excitement of a particular time in history. (more…) Continue Reading →

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Arts, humanities funds on chopping block

DC

In all of the post-election chaos, it’s easy to overlook the minor casualties. Some of them may be in Montana. The Trump administration, eager to ramp up spending on the military, border control and infrastructure, all while cutting taxes and shoring up Social Security and healthcare, is desperate to find spending cuts. (more…) Continue Reading →

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At long last, exhibit pays tribute to pioneering artist

Board

Twenty-three years after her death, an influential painter who spent most of her life on her family’s ranch near Absarokee is finally getting the exhibit she deserved. “A Lonely Business: Isabelle Johnson’s Montana” opens to the public on Tuesday, Nov. 3, and will stay up through Jan. 3. (more…) Continue Reading →

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Remembering Jane Estelle: ‘She saved our lives’

Jane

Paula McClave had been seeing therapists on and off for almost 25 years when someone suggested she try C. Jane Estelle, whom everyone knew as Jane. It took her a year to call and make an appointment, she said, “but it was the best thing I ever did.”

“I had seen a lot of therapists, and I had given up,” she said. “But I walked into her office and I said, ‘Oh, my God, I have met my soulmate.’” (more…) Continue Reading →

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More attention for a worthy artist

Crow

I’ve been meaning to post this since Friday, when the Billings Gazette featured Ben Pease in a story about the Yellowstone Art Museum’s annual auction. I wanted to draw readers’ attention to a story I wrote about Ben in the earliest days of Last Best News. We had a lot fewer readers then, naturally, so I wanted to give current readers a chance to catch up. I also wrote a short blog item about how I stumbled onto Ben’s great work at the Montana Folk Festival in Butte and just knew I had to write a story about him. As a bonus, the story contains some fine John Warner photographs. Continue Reading →

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Cody artist’s ‘lost treasures’ on display through April 10

Family

In a nondescript metal warehouse on the outskirts of Cody, Wyoming, sits an unlikely treasure: a vast body of work by an artist praised by Jackson Pollock, displayed at prestigious museums of art across the United States, and collected by Presidents Ronald Reagan, Gerald Ford and Lyndon Johnson. The artist, the late Harry Jackson, of Cody and Camaiore, Italy, left behind an extraordinary legacy reflective of a life that spanned more than eight decades and several continents. (more…) Continue Reading →

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Guest edit: The truth hurts—now, let’s work on downtown

I am of course aware of Billings Gazette editor Darrell Ehrlick’s column and some of the conversation downtown. Ehrlick’s description of downtown Billings on Black Friday, Nov. 28, was unfortunately true. One of my associates and I also noticed most of the problems Ehrlick mentioned around our office that day. (more…) Continue Reading →

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A very public poet celebrates new book

Vanishing

Dave Caserio is a poet, but he is best known in Billings as a performer of poetry. In the past 10 years he has collaborated with musicians, dancers, actors, painters and other poets to create improvisational amalgams of creativity unlike anything else available in this part of the world. (more…) Continue Reading →

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Hard, rewarding work in the middle of an ocean of snow

Smith

As people in Billings cautiously toy with the idea that our long, snowy winter might finally be over, consider how Pat Smith describes the best part of his job:

“Imagine turning in a circle to see endless white and blue divided by the horizon line, knowing there is up to two miles of snow and ice depth beneath you. I suppose it is similar to being a sailor in the middle of the ocean, a sense of solitude and beauty in the starkness of the place.” (more…) Continue Reading →

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