Daines, Gianforte tout tech growth at Missoula summit

Daines

Back in the 1970s, when Steve Daines was on a family trip to Disneyland, a woman asked him about life back home. Her impression of Montana was stereotypical at best  — a third-world state far removed from economic prosperity.

Kicking off the Montana High Tech Jobs Summit on Monday, Daines, now a U.S. senator representing the state, said times have changed. Technology has removed the barriers of geography, and Montana’s booming tech sector competes at the enterprise level with the world’s top firms. Continue Reading →

Workers rush to save Glacier chalet before winter comes

Sound

In a race against winter they’re determined not to lose, 10 workers are camped in Glacier National Park’s backcountry, rushing to stabilize the burned-out shell of Sperry Chalet before it is buried beneath the snow.

The work is privately funded through donations to the Glacier National Park Conservancy’s Sperry Action Fund, created the day after a wildfire overran the 103-year-old chalet on Aug. 31. Continue Reading →

Prairie Lights: In Philadelphia, a hero for our times

Catto

On my first visit to Philadelphia last week, I was overwhelmed by history.

I gawked at the Liberty Bell, stood in the hall where the founders created the Constitution, admired the house where Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence and even stumbled upon a little Jewish cemetery where the honored dead included the man whose ship brought the Liberty Bell to America. Continue Reading →

Made-in-Montana pedicabs featured in Philly art project

Philly

PHILADELPHIA — Though it’s doubtful many people here know it, key components of a major public arts project in Philadelphia were made in Montana.

The project, “Fireflies,” by the Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang, consists of hundreds of handmade Chinese lanterns on display aboard a fleet of pedicabs that have been plying the Benjamin Franklin Parkway Parkway since mid-September. Continue Reading →

Rocky students lead the way in Montana turtle study

Kayhan

Six years ago, during a walk along the Yellowstone River, I caught a glimpse of something I had never seen before. It was obviously a turtle, but with a shell unlike any I had ever seen before — a shell that looked like a pancake.

One second this beautiful creature was there, sunning itself on a muddy beach, and then the next all I saw were ripples where it slid into the water to escape me. I found out later it was a spiny softshell turtle – a shy, elusive reptile that is found in the river systems of southeast Montana and about which wildlife biologists know little. Continue Reading →